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August 22, 2009

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I like the kids in need box idea. I have talked about doing that, but then I go out and voluntarily buy shit for my kids and I can't ask them to give something away in that situation. My oldest is really spoiled by getting stuff and I know that's my fault. He thinks everytime we go to the store, he should get a toy because I often bribe him to behave or stop whining while I grocery shop (at Super Target). I hate that but I know it's of my own creation. Ugh! And I don't even get stuff sent to me for free!! I'm dumb enough to buy it all. lol

We've started doing the allowance thing with our 8yo. Anything outside his needs, and special occasions that we celebrate need to be paid for with his allowance. We also pay him for grades because school is his job. It's really helped with the "Can I get"s at the store. All I have to say is "Do you have any money?" We've also had some hard lessons in spending vs. saving, but he's learning to save.

So true! When I tell my kids that I don't have any money to buy what they want, they tell me, "Just go to the ATM!"

Kristen,

I really like your post. We are STRUGGLING right now with the grandparents going overboard, crazy overboard when they visit. My MIL will take my daughter to Target for "a few things." They come back with Santa's sack. I'm not kidding. Clothes, shoes, Barbies, purses, DVD's. It's ridiculous. My husband has talked to them (he's an only child), but they just choose to do as they please. Not sure where this is all going. Anyway, just wanted to say thanks for your post.

Kristen,
First: let me proclaim that I am not a parent, so anyone can decline to listen to this.
Second: our public radio station aired this short piece by one mother dealing with the same thing:
http://www.kqed.org/epArchive/R908050737
Third: I recommend a book by David Owen, The First National Bank of Dad,
http://tinyurl.com/kw6cyc
Great book. I wish that I had learned its concepts much earlier in life than I have.

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